All The Incredible Food We Ate in Japan

Open Mind + Open Mouth = Best Japanese Food Sensations!

Living in Japan for three years really changed me at my core especially if you subscribe to the idea of “you are what you eat.” I’m sure if you asked me when I was twenty if I would eat fish eggs, cold noodles, whole baby octopus, raw anemone, or even seaweed the answer would have been a resounding “No” coupled with disbelief that anyone would eat these things. However, I have always been interested in food and traveling, and I tend to think that if someone else likes something then there’s a good chance I’ll enjoy it too. So it went with at least the most popular Japanese food.

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All The Incredible Food We Ate in Japan - Jim and me at a grill restaurant.

Scallops on the grill along with all kinds of Japanese delicacies. Eating in Japan is an experience for your mind and your body.

In Japan you’ll see everyone very obviously enjoying everything they eat. I’ll never forget the first time I saw someone eating cold soba noodles: the loud, sloppy slurping of the soba noodles followed with that contented sigh as the last of it disappears into a mouth that slowly turns into a contented smile. I can’t say I’ve become a fan of all Japanese food, there are a few things that just didn’t work on my palate, but there is more than enough that I love that when we moved away it didn’t take long to really miss the food of Japan. One thing we knew we needed to do when we visited Japan recently was eat as many of the different foods we loved as possible. This article is a photo journal of some of the best Japanese food from our trip.

Caution – Continue On An Empty Stomach at Your Own Risk!

Shoyu Ramen with pork belly

Shoyu Ramen with pork belly. Look at that luscious brown broth. No wonder it’s so popular!

Jim, Erika, Michael eating ramen, one of the most popular Japanese foods for sure.

The Ramen Museum in Tokyo is well worth a stop. Ramen has got to be one of the most popular Japanese foods.

Ramen

I love ramen. All ramen. But some of it is better than others. You can really tell the difference when it is made by a master. The broth is a labor of love, concocted over hours and hours in a massive stew pot. The broth should be rich, salty and packed with layer upon layer of flavor, the meat must be tender enough to pull apart with your chopsticks and melt in your mouth. The noodles need to be just right, not too soft and not too hard. Really, a great bowl of ramen is spiritual!

Of course you can find ramen in every single town, village, or even rest stop in Japan. However, if you are going to Tokyo to see all the sights, you will want to make one of those the Ramen Museum.

Tempura bowl, one of the most popular Japanese foods, along with Kirin beer and misu soup.

If this isn’t the best Japanese food, what is? Tempura don, miso soup, and Kirin from the tap. Need I say more?

Tempura

Tempura is always good, but there are some seasonal variations that are so much better than others. You can almost always get peppers, onion, sweet potato, eggplant, mushroom, shrimp, or fish, but I really love the pumpkin but it is usually only available during the fall and early winter. Please, don’t get me started on miso soup, mmm, I could have it with breakfast, lunch, and dinner. Oh wait, that’s exactly how you’ll get it in Japan. The first time I realized I didn’t mind tofu was in miso soup.

 

One of the most popular Japanese foods is the not-so-Japanese cream puff pictured here.

Beard Papa Cream Puffs. You know how you go to the mall, and you just can’t pass up that one snack. Well, in Japan this might be that snack!

Dessert

Always save room for desert, I always say, and while you may not find the best choices in the restaurant, there is almost always a bakery around the corner. Beard Papa is a Japanese cream puff franchise that has gone global. The French may have invented the cream puff, but Japan has brought them to the world in a big way. Super fresh, super rich, and super delicious. You can find a store in just about every major city, especially in the malls.

Gyoza two ways

Gyoza two ways. Why not? Sometimes I just can’t make up my mind. No need to add anything more, either…it’s gyoza all the way, one of the most popular Japanese foods of all time!

Gyoza

It seems like everyone is familiar with that Seinfeld episode with the tiny little soup restaurant. It’s too bad the guy who ran the joint was such a jerk, because he was really on to something. Something the Japanese have been doing for ages. Perfect something, become a master at it, and then do nothing but that one thing as best you can, always striving to do it even better each time. The best places to eat in Japan are just like this. They make one thing, maybe with a couple of variations but not many, and that’s it; but, that one thing they make is perfection on a plate. This gyoza restaurant, Harajuku Gyoza-ro,  had a line out the door and six or seven guys making gyoza and plating it as fast as was humanly possible. You want ramen instead of gyoza? Forget it! Rice? What? With gyoza? No way. Find the line, wait in it, eat the gyoza!

Sticks to fry any kind of Japanese food you can think of crowd the table and boiling pot.

All you can eat, deep fry at your table. Who knew? This is buffet style, so you can go get your favorites over and over.

Fried Food

This was a new one for me. I’ve had the Viking all you can eat, cook it at your table over hot coals, or on a hot grill, but this was the first time I’d seen a deep fryer set in a recess smack dab in the middle of the table. How does it work? Easy enough, get seated, get a small bowl of batter and a bowl of bread crumbs, and then head to the buffet. Meats, vegetables, breads, potatoes, sweets, you can’t imagine what all you can deep fry until you’ve worked your way through the buffet. Oh yeah, don’t forget the sauces!

Little red octupi ready to eat.

Sweet baby octopus, with a twist, maybe not the most popular Japanese food, but a fun one to try anyway.

Octopus

Sure, we’ve all had baby octopus, right? But I’ll bet you’ve never had it with a cooked egg stuffed in its head. That’s OK, neither had I. It was chewy and tasty, and…weird. These are a specialty of Kyoto, and that’s the only place I’ve seen them. But they are very popular. Would I buy a ten pack like everyone else? No, but the one I ate was pretty good. I certainly wouldn’t turn down a free sample in Costco. In fact, we found them in the Kyoto market which is someplace you need to add to your Kyoto itinerary along with visiting all the amazing sites such as the Fushimi Inari Shrine or the  Otagi Nenbutsu Temple.

Kobe beef being cooked by a chef

Kobe Beef. K-o-b-e  B-e-e-f!

Kobe Beef

Yes, America does produce some great beef, and the Argentians are no slouches in the steak department either. However, the best steak I’ve had anywhere, was in Kobe. Beer fed, hand massaged, these cows live the life. Until they don’t. Then they get cut up into thick steaks and grilled to perfection by a master teppenyaki chef, right there in front of your mouth watering eyes! Expensive? Perhaps, but worth every yen!

There are many great Kobe beef restaurants sprinkled all over the city, but right in the center is Steakland.  It was amazing, and you can make reservations.  Just have your hotel call for you.

 

Soba noodles served hot

A hearty, rich bowl of hot soba soup…

Beautiful soba noodles on stone plates

Or slurp your soba up cold. Either way it’s out of this world! I’m not sure if the rest of the world thinks this is the best Japanese food, but Corinne did. It’s all she talked about.

Soba

Yes, both of those photographs go together. Again, this was one of those “We do one thing, and we do it perfectly” restaurants. The thing they did here was soba. Homemade, buckwheat noodles that carry the flavors and tastes of the broth or sauce they are paired with like nothing else on Earth. I didn’t think I liked them cold so I ordered the hot soba soup in a miso broth with fresh grated horseradish. It was unbelievable! The best noodle dish or soup I’ve ever had. Then the cold soba came out and I tried it. Wait, can I eat half this bowl of soup and then get a half order of cold soba? When you go to Nara, feed the deer, visit the shrines and temples, then find this tiny little soba restaurant. Please, do it for me.

Frying the okonomiyaki and one person eating it

One of Hiroshima’s signature dishes is their own version of okonomiyaki.

Okonomiyaki

What’s okonomiyaki? It’s a pile of fried noodles, with meat and vegetables  topped with an omelette and, of course, a secret sauce. When you go to Hiroshima you have to eat it. It’s a law or something. Seriously, it doesn’t sound, look, or seem like a good idea, but it really is delicious. Where do you find it? Surely you’ve learned this lesson by now, but just in case, you’ll find it at an Okonomiyaki restaurant. There were a few different options on the limited menu but they all had some form of fried noodle, vegetables, meat, and egg.

2 oysters being grilled

Barbecued oysters. Yes please! Miyajima is known for more than just its super photogenic orange torrii gate.

Oysters

Just south of Hiroshima, on a little island with the name of Miyajima, you’ll find a stunning, golden torii gate floating majestically in in the water of the small cove. You’ll also find these succulent barbecued oysters. This wasn’t really a meal, you’d need to eat quite a few oysters to get full, but they made for a great snack after taking several hundred photographs of the torii and the ancient temples and shrines on the island. There were a few different sauces to try so we had a few of each; the miso and the garlic with butter were the best of the best.

 

Crab sushi being delivered on a sushi train to the table

Sushi shinkansen! Sushi delivered by a train. I would venture that worldwide sushi is the absolute most popular Japanese food. Period!

Sushi

Wait, you can get sushi in Japan? Who knew? There are some truly epic sushi restaurants in every corner of the country. The best ones I’ve been at were all right smack dab in the middle of the fish markets. It just doesn’t get any fresher than ocean to boat to auction to table all within a tightly packed square kilometer. But if there’s no market nearby, it’s no problem. There will certainly be a sushi restaurant or ten just around the next corner (unless everyone in the car is really hangry, then they can be harder to spot). I love a good conveyor belt sushi, but even better than that is the shinkansen express. Order your plates and wait a few minutes for the chef to prepare and set them on the train. The your plates of fresh sushi are whisked out of the kitchen and directly to your table.

Six cucumber maki rolls

What? You won’t eat raw fish? That’s just more for me I guess. You can always try these vegetarian maki rolls.

Sushi isn’t just about the raw fish sitting on rice. It’s also about the maki, or rolls. A plain cucumber, rice, and seaweed roll is the perfect palate cleanser. Of course, so is a big dab of wasabi!

Michael eating mochi from a Japanese food stall

One last tempting snack, grilled mochii! Not my favorite, but my daughter Erika loves it!

I do think we did a fantastic job finding the best Japanese food on our road trip through the country, but there’s so much mor!  Not only do I not want to bore you, I’m just can’t handle composing this article any longer. I’ve been salivating and dying of hunger the whole time I’ve been writing. Time to go find a quick cup noodle to fill my cravings. While I’m doing that, did you know that Japan loves their Kit Kat candy bars and creates new flavors all the time?  Check out our video where we try a bunch of them.

Traveling to Japan? You’ll never believe the deals on these Tokyo hotels!!!

What do you think is the best Japanese food?

 

Pin some of the best Japanese foods for later!

The best thing about a visit to Japan is discovering the best Japanese foods!

The best thing about a visit to Japan is discovering the best Japanese foods!

 

The best thing about a visit to Japan is discovering the best Japanese foods!

20 Comments

  1. Darn, I haven’t had dinner! I’ve only got myself to blame for not heeding your warning about reading on an empty stomach. Japanese food has got to be up there with Thai and Italian food as one of the best in the world, for me. To your excellent list, I would add sashimi, chirashi, chicken karaage and unagi! 🙂

  2. Nom nom nom! I agree 100% ! I’m travelling through Japan now for the second time and it’s my favourite country out of 90 visited! I always tell people they should come to Japan just for the food, but everything here is awesome. Nice article.

  3. I was only in Japan for a week (and for work, so not much time to explore) but I spent every spare second eating – I loved everything! As you say, the best sushi I had was in a fish market: nothing ever compared with that afterwards, it ruined sushi for me forever 🙂

  4. Love miso soup! That was the first thing that caught my eye. The second, was it looks like it might be tough to eat a lot of the foods in Japan being Gluten free. But, had fun checking out all your photos!

  5. 3 years living in Japan, that should have been so awesome!!!
    All these delicacies give me the furious envy to go to Japan now. It’s at the top of my wishlist, but India is calling me again.
    A few years ago, I had a young Japanese girl at home for one week. She cooked me a lot of delicious sushis, sashimis, curry meat, etc. I didn’t want her to live 😀

  6. Japan is a really wonderful country with lots of different amazing cuisines.
    Sushi is my all time favorite, really love this dish,
    bye the way @ Stephanie Langlet you looking really nice in that Indian ethnic wear.
    Keep posting
    Cheers 🙂

  7. I do not have much knowledge of Japanese cuisine as they are not that much exposed as say, Chinese and Thai Cuisines.Your article covers Japanese cuisine well and is a good reference to people new to this cuisine.

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